How to choose the suitable rubber for moulding applications

Rubber is a popular material for moulding applications due to its flexibility, durability, and resistance to wear and tear. However, with so many types of rubber available, choosing the right one for your moulding application can be daunting. This article will discuss some factors to consider when selecting rubber for moulding applications.


Temperature range

The first factor to consider when selecting rubber for moulding applications is the temperature range the material will be exposed to. Different types of rubber have different temperature ranges, and choosing a material that can withstand the temperature extremes of your application is crucial. For example, if your application involves high temperatures, you may consider silicone rubber, which can withstand temperatures up to 232°C. On the other hand, if your application involves low temperatures, you may want to consider fluorocarbon rubber, which can withstand temperatures as low as -40°C.


Chemical resistance

Another critical factor to consider when selecting rubber for moulding applications is the material's chemical resistance. Different types of rubber have varying levels of resistance to various chemicals, and choosing a material that can withstand the chemicals present in your application is essential. For example, if your application involves exposure to oil or gasoline, you may want to consider nitrile rubber, which has excellent resistance to these chemicals. On the other hand, if your application involves exposure to acids or solvents, you may want to consider fluorocarbon rubber, which has excellent chemical resistance.


Hardness

The hardness of the rubber is another factor to consider when selecting a rubber for moulding applications. Hardness is measured on the Shore A scale, with higher numbers indicating harder materials. The hardness of the rubber will affect its flexibility, durability, and resistance to wear and tear. Therefore, choosing a material with the appropriate hardness for your application is vital. For example, if your application requires a flexible rubber, you may want to consider a material with a lower Shore A hardness, such as silicone rubber. On the other hand, if your application requires a more rigid rubber, you may want to consider a material with a higher Shore A hardness, such as neoprene rubber.


Compression set resistance

Compression set resistance is another critical factor when selecting rubber for moulding applications. Compression set resistance refers to the ability of the material to recover its shape after being compressed. If a rubber material has poor compression set resistance, it may not be suitable for applications that involve repeated compression and expansion. For example, if your application uses gaskets or seals that will be compressed and released repeatedly, you may want to consider a material with excellent compression set resistance, such as silicone rubber.


Tear resistance

Tear resistance is another essential factor when selecting rubber for moulding applications. Tear resistance refers to the ability of the material to resist tearing under stress. If a rubber material has poor tear resistance, it may not be suitable for applications that involve high stress levels. For example, if your application involves the use of rubber parts that will be subjected to high levels of stress, such as conveyor belts or rollers, you may want to consider a material with excellent tear resistance, such as neoprene rubber.


Contact Specialized Mouldings for details

Specialized Mouldings South Africa is an expert in everything rubber. Therefore, we ensure the correct rubber for moulding applications is selected to manufacture your parts. Contact us today to discuss your rubber product needs.